BOOKS



 

 
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THERE HAS TO BE A BETTER WAY: LESSONS FROM FORMER URBAN TEACHERS

Teacher attrition has long been a significant challenge within the field of education. It is a commonly-cited statistic that almost fifty percent of beginning teachers leave the field within their first five years, to the detriment of schools, students, and their own career development. There Has to be a Better Way offers an essential voice in understanding the dynamics of teacher attrition from the perspective of the teachers themselves. Drawing upon in-depth qualitative research with former teachers from urban schools in multiple regions of the United States, Lynnette Mawhinney and Carol R. Rinke identify several themes that uncover the rarely-spoken reasons why teachers so often willingly leave the classroom. The authors go further to provide concrete recommendations for how school administrators can better support their practicing teachers, as well as how teacher educators might enhance preparation for the next generation of educators. 

 
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TEACHER EDUCATION ACROSS MINORITY-SERVING INSTITUTIONS: PROGRAMS, POLICIES, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE


*Winner of the 2018 American Educational Research Association's (Division K) Award for Exemplary Research in Teaching and Teacher Education*

The first of its kind, Teacher Education across Minority-Serving Institutions brings together innovative work from the family of institutions known as minority-serving institutions: Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions. The book moves beyond a singular focus on teacher racial diversity that has characterized scholarship and policy work in this area. Instead, it pushes for scholars to consider that racial diversity in teacher education is not simply an end in itself but is, a means to accomplish other goals, such as developing justice-oriented and asset-based pedagogies.

Access a Sample Excerpt:  HERE                                       

 

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WE GOT NEXT: URBAN EDUCATION AND THE NEXT GENERATION OF BLACK TEACHERS

Developing a more culturally diverse teaching force is one of the most important tasks facing the education system in the United States. Yet, in the midst of this challenge, little is known about who these teachers might be or where they might come from. We Got Next: Urban Education and the Next Generation of Black Teachers illustrates the journeys that Black pre-service teachers travel in their attempts to become educators. By looking at their educational life histories – their schooling experiences, teaching philosophies, and personal motivation – this book discovers what compels them to become teachers and the struggles and successes they encounter along the way. With texture and care, We Got Next helps professionals, policymakers, and teacher educators to understand what draws young African Americans toward the teaching profession and how to help them get there.

 

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REVIEWS

 

THERE HAS TO BE A BETTER WAY: LESSONS FROM FORMER URBAN TEACHERS

"Mawhinney and Rinke's focus on teachers who have voluntarily left classroom teaching prior to retirement is unique. This well-crafted study fills a void in the current literature."
Tachelle Banks, coeditor of Teaching Students Who are Disturbed and Disturbing: An Integrative Approach
 

 

TEACHER EDUCATION ACROSS MINORITY-SERVING INSTITUTIONS: PROGRAMS, POLICIES, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

"Petchauer and Mawhinney's Teacher Education across MSIs is the first book to include the voices of MSI scholars on the topic of teacher education at MSIs. These institutions are vital to ensuring a diverse teaching force in the U.S."
Marybeth Gasman, Professor, University of Pennsylvania and Director, Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions

“With wide-ranging implications for higher education policy, Teacher Education across Minority Serving Institutions is honest and optimistic about transforming teaching practice through MSI teacher prep programs. Its grounded perspectives, intelligent analyses, and compelling narratives make this book an insightful read and a valuable contribution to higher education literature.”
Ivory Toldson, Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Negro Education and Former Director, White House Initiative on HBCUs
 

 

WE GOT NEXT: URBAN EDUCATION AND THE NEXT GENERATION OF BLACK TEACHERS

"It is clear Lynnette Mawhinney truly understands what can be conceptualized, studied, and practiced as two disparate fields – urban education and pre-service teacher education, as she sheds light on the intersecting nature of them. Indeed, this is a serious book that will make an important contribution to what we know about the teacher education pipeline, urban education, as well as how to study the lived experiences of Black pre-service teachers. (Excerpt from forward)"
H. Richard Milner IV, Helen Faison Endowed Chair of Urban Education, Director of the Center for Urban Education,  University of Pittsburgh

"Mawhinney challenges social justice pedagogues to contemplate what is happening in the sixteen-year cycle of learning that inhibits people from achieving career goals...This volume may rightfully be used as a magnifying glass into the challenges urban systems face. However, Mawhinney challenges the reader not to get lost in the very familiar story about low-performing schools and general community dysfunction. (Excerpt from review in the Journal of Urban Learning, Teaching, and Research"
Joy Barnes-Johnson, Lecturer, University of Wisconsin

 

 

PRESS COVERAGE

 

TEACHER EDUCATION ACROSS MINORITY-SERVING INSTITUTIONS: PROGRAMS, POLICIES, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

*Why They Leave: New Book Explores the Reasons Teachers Give for Quitting the Profession (Hint: It’s Not Students)

*40% of America’s Schools Don’t Have a Single Educator of Color

*Faculty Feature: A Conversation with Dr. Lynnette Mawhinney

*Mawhinney's New Book Examines Teacher Education at Minority-Serving Institutions

*Sharing Teacher Education to Meet Our District Needs

*Teacher Certification Exams as Barriers to the Diversification of the Teacher Workforce

*It's a Family Affair: Teacher Education at Minority Serving Institutions

*Guide for Educators to Feature Tribal College Professionals' Work